Cinda Williams Chima

Author of The Gray Wolf Thorne

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Cinda Williams Chima was a recipient of the 2008 Lit Award for Fiction from the Cleveland Lit and Cleveland Magazine's Interesting Person 2009.


Bruce Holbert on finding your path.


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Featured Articles & Reviews

Platform? Say What?
by Laura Munson
read article
Trustworthy
by Jennifer Paros
read article
Book Reviews
Editor's Pick
Anna Dressed in Blood

reviewed by A.B. Mead
read article
Articles
Embrace Your Editor
(but Not in a Weird Way)

by Erin Brown
read article

Platform? Say What?
by Laura Munson

For all you writers out there, here’s the deal-- with a golden solution at the end:

(The news as it was delivered in June, 2009…and what happened when I paid attention)

“What’s that you said?  Platform?  I’m sorry, I don’t think I heard you right.  Must be the truck that just ran me over.  Could you come again?  I think what you said is that it’s practically impossible to get my books published in today’s market without a Platform.  Is that correct?” 

Big-time New York publishing-world person responds. 

Turns out I heard right.

“I need to sit down.  I think I’m going to throw up.”

Big-time New York publishing-world person says something about it being good news.  That I don’t have to throw up.  That social media is the new frontier and it’s full of Platforms.  Exclamation point.  Smiley face.  Like she’s just come back from a blogger’s convention or took a hit of Ecstasy or something.  more...

Trustworthy
by Jennifer Paros

Several years ago, a social worker named Julio Diaz was mugged during his subway commute to the Bronx.  A teenage boy threatened him with a knife and Julio gave him his wallet.  Then Julio offered him his coat to keep him warm, and suggested they have dinner together.  The boy questioned him but agreed. They went to a familiar diner; the mugger took note of how nice Julio was to everyone, saying, “I didn’t think people actually behaved that way.”  Diaz offered to treat for the meal but said he’d need his wallet back to do so; the boy returned it without hesitation.  Then he gave the teen twenty dollars and asked that he give him the knife.  And the boy did. 

Diaz later said, “I figure, you know, if you treat people right, you can only hope that they treat you right.” 

We are often taught that trust is to be reserved for those situations or people who present themselves in such a way as to inspire trust within us – those who have proven themselves trustworthy more...

Book Reviewss
Editor's Pick
Anna Dressed in Blood

reviewed by A.B. Mead

Though billed as a YA novel, this cool and creepy ghost story is definitely for those closer to the adult end of the spectrum. Theseus Cassio (call him “Cas”) Lowood is a high school student who is also a ghost hunter (don't call him a “Ghostbuster”). When he wields the athame, an ancient blade, he becomes more than just your average kid. He can put an end to malevolent ghosts that kill people. Where their spirits go, he doesn't know, but after Cas is done with them, they're no longer around to slay the innocent. Cas moves from high school to high school, as he and his mother, a low-level white witch, travel North America on the hunt. He's just come to a small town in Canada to put an end to Anna Dressed in Blood, the murderous shade of teen-aged girl who was brutally killed half a century ago on her way to a dance. But when he confronts her before he's ready, and she clearly has the advantage, she declines to kill him. Could there be more to her story than the popular legend says? And might the death of the previous owner of athame, Cas' father, have anything to do with this? 

Fans of Buffy the Vampire the Slayer will see that this is clearly designed to be a boy version of that property.  more...

Articles
Embrace Your Editor (but Not in a Weird Way)

by Erin Brown

You’ve slaved for months, years, decades even, to finish your manuscript. You’ve tackled all-nighters, tear-your-hair-out rewrites, grueling, self-imposed deadlines; you’ve grappled with creative juices that either flowed until you were drunk with brilliant narrative or dried up to leave you parched, devoid of inspiration, sobbing onto your keyboard. You get my drift. You’ve poured your heart and soul into this baby of yours and then, finally, you get it into the hands of an editor—whether it be a freelancer (like moi—the best kind, of course) or an editor at a publishing house (wow, also fabulous and just like me—at least in my past Manhattan life). You couldn’t be happier! Finally, someone to tell you how wonderful your writing is! To affirm what you’ve known all along; that your novel/memoir/epic saga/brilliant tome will change the literary world as we know it.

But then you get back the editor’s notes (insert ominous music here). “Hey! This wasn’t what you signed up for—there’s red all over this damn thing! She’s rewritten half of chapter one! She wants me to completely get rid of the elfin king/swashbuckling sidekick/sickly grandmother/omniscient narrator/the last half of the book!” This is a travesty, right? Wrong. This is an editor’s job. To make a manuscript the best it can be, based on years of experience, knowledge of the industry (hopefully, if you get a good one), and their honed skills of enhancing storytelling and writing.  more...

 

 

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