Meg Cabot

Author of Overbite

Meg Cabot is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Princess Diaries series, which was made into two hit movies, sold over 16 million copies, and been translated into 38 languages.


Bruce Holbert on finding your path.


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Featured Articles & Reviews

Across The Blank Page
by Bill Kenower
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Victory
by Jennifer Paros
read article
Book Reviews
Editor's Pick
The Map of Time

reviewed by Kevin Lauderdale
read article
Articles
Rejection Hell:
You’re Not Alone

by Erin Brown
read article

Across The Blank Page
by Bill Kenower

When Author was still in its infancy, I had the chance to interview the novelist Alice Hoffman. I mentioned that I had just listened to an interview with Meryl Streep in which the actress discussed her doubt that anyone would still want to cast her in a movie. Hoffman, who has had a long, prolific, profitable, and decorated career, said she felt much same say. “With every novel,” she explained, “I feel that I don’t know how to write a novel.  It never gets easier.  And I always think maybe this is horrible.” 

I remembered Hoffman’s comments two years later when I interviewed Louis Sachar, author of, among many other books, Holes, the bestselling young adult novel for which he won both the Newberry and the National Book Award. Sachar described a conversation he’d had recently with Judy Blume in which he asked the legendary children’s book author if she ever wondered if a book she’d just finished was any good at all. “Every one,” she replied.

When I look at the world of writing instruction and writing advice, most of what I see are books and magazine articles focused on the craft and the business of writing. more...

Victory
by Jennifer Paros

The other night, my husband, my youngest son, and I all sat down to play a game of SORRY.  It took a little convincing, though, as my son  - due to a recent losing streak – had banned most board games.  Warily, he agreed to play. 

If you’re familiar with SORRY you know that the object is for each player to get all his pieces safely Home.  There’s also Safety Zones where one is no longer vulnerable to the schemes and brutality of the other players.  Eventually, all of us were in our Safety Zones, drawing card after card  (no dice in Sorry) to see who would win. 

My son was in near agony with anticipation.  And then, when the fateful card was drawn and my husband claimed victory, my youngest bellowed over the unfairness, stormed off, and slammed his bedroom door. 

For a long time now, he has equated losing at games with being a loser and so, for him, it wasn’t a matter of who got to move a little plastic piece to the space marked Home first, it was a matter of his value being on the line.  He has yet to embrace himself separate and stable from the things he does and their outcomes.  Not, actually, in truth, so unlike me. more...

Book Reviewss
Editor's Pick
The Map of Time

reviewed by Kevin Lauderdale

Set in late-Victorian England, this sprawling neo-Victorian novel (the author addresses the reader, there is occasional flowery language) plays with our and the characters' expectations about time travel. Its no spoiler to say that time travel is impossible. The two instances of it depicted early this book is revealed to be frauds, one part of an elaborate, proto-Disneyesque business. Where other novels might have ended with these reveals, that's were this one gets started. And because all of it is fake, that's what makes the story so much more interesting and human than if it had been real. We have the pleasure of watching the characters scramble to make what they have set in motion seem inevitable rather then the result of complex machinations. Because it's not real, there's the possibility that they might fail, which raises the stakes for everyone. The multiple plots center on poor, benighted H.G. Wells who soon wishes he had never written The Time Machine. People keep coming to him hoping he possesses the secret of time travel, and he's drawn into their desires and lives. One man wants to go back just eight years to stop the woman he loves from becoming one of Jack the Ripper's victims, while another has seen the future year of 2000 where mankind battles steam-powered automatons in a devastated London. more...

Articles
Rejection Hell: You’re Not Alone

by Erin Brown

I’ve been receiving a rash of emails lately lamenting the abject horror of the whole submission—a.k.a. rejection—process. Bottom line: it sucks. Royally.

It’s similar to going on a first date after months (hell, years!!) of preparation: you’re dressed to the nines, sparkly and brilliant for the occasion, putting your best foot forward, excited, ready for the world to be yours and…your jerk of a date takes one brief look at you and says with a smirk, “Nah, you’re no good. Not my type. Ugly. Bad personality. Move along, please.” Facing rejection of your manuscript, your baby, your passion, is no different.

Apparently, writers are supposed to just shrug and submit to this masochistic process at least another fifty times in a row. Are you kidding me? This painful submission process puts writers on par with actors, singers, comedians, artists—any passion that must be ultimately judged by others in order to succeed and reach the masses. It’s a tough gig, and only those with fortitude and true talent will rise to the top. more...

 

 

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