Nora Ephron

Author of I Remember Nothing

Nora Eprhon has written and directed such films as Sleepless in Seattle, When Harry Met Sally, Michael, You’ve Got Mail,and Julie and Julia.


Bruce Holbert on finding your path.


Recent Blog Posts:


Editor's Blog

Sign up for Author's Mailing List

Author will not share your email address.

Featured Articles & Reviews

Pie
by Laura Munson
read article
Find Yourself in Everything
by Jennifer Paros
read article
Book Reviews
Editor's Pick
Confessions of the Sullivan Sisters

reviewed by Hayden Bass
read article
Articles
Show, Don't Tell: Real Examples, Real Books, Real Good Stuff

by Erin Brown
read article

Pie
by Laura Munson

Mostly, I’ve been a back door sort of submitter.  I didn’t used to be.  I used to march straight through the front door and send my stuff out shotgun.  In fact, the very first story I wrote, I sent, wait for it…to the New Yorker.  And when I got that first form rejection, I was stunned.  I was twenty.  I was a dreamer, not really a writer.  And dreamers are a bit delusional.  So I kept sending out that short story—Harpers, Esquire, every magazine I could think of, every literary review I found in the Harvard Square kiosk (we didn’t have the internet yet).  Still rejection after rejection.  After rejection.  I had a bulletin board over my desk with a chart full of all my submissions written on butcher block paper.  In the section which I’d entitled Y/N, there were so many N’s that I did that N some courtesy and elongated it to Nope.  To this day it’s still Nope, only now I know how to make a spreadsheet on my computer.  I sort of miss that bulletin board.  It was so visceral, writing Nope in Sharpie on butcher’s block paper pinned up with thumb tacks.  

Then I read somewhere—Hemingway On Writing or something like that, that you just had to write and write and write and stop trying to get published, and so I spent the next half of my life writing.  I recoiled from submitting.  I wrote some essays and stories, cast them off into the wind from time to time, and got down to work, ignoring the rejections as they came in—well, KIND of ignoring them.   more...

Find Yourself in Everything
by Jennifer Paros

Years ago, I had just put my youngest son to bed when I heard tell tale sounds, ran in, and found him throwing up.  Excepting the desk and the walls, there was much to be tidied.  A bit rattled over where to start, I cleaned the child first and set him out of the fray while I stripped the bed of everything.  Awkwardly scooping up bedding and clothing, I headed for the laundry room, still fueled by my emergency mentality.  But while crossing the living room, I stopped – perhaps to reconfigure my load – and something happened.  In a moment, I went from concerned and agitated to… a happy person.  All of a sudden I felt grateful for being able to take care of someone I loved, for having the son I did, for all of it. No longer did it matter that I had initially judged the conditions as unwanted.  The details of the experience itself didn’t matter; I was feeling love for the opportunity of life. 

This moment has remained with me, a reminder that if I could feel authentically happy and blessed in the company of a vomiting child there is something in me so smart and loving that the specifics of my experiences never matter to it as much as the creative act of living itself.  And since 100% of what I worry about are the specifics of what might or might not happen – as though my happiness depends upon those details – I am left to wonder why I am worrying when I’ve already been taught that that is simply not true.  more...

Book Reviews
Editor's Pick
An Object of Beauty

reviewed by Kevin Lauderdale

Comedian Martin has proven himself quite skilled at drama as well, and, with this short novel, he continues to demonstrate his ability to create characters that, even if they aren’t exactly sympathetic, remain nonetheless, fascinating. In a sort of postmodern Breakfast at Tiffany's, Martin uses the voice of Daniel Chester French Franks, a young freelance writer, to tell the story of Lacey Yeager, as she works her way up from the bottom of the art world, partly through drive and the slow accumulation of knowledge, and partly by sleeping with a few well-chosen men. Lacey comes in and out of Daniel’s life, and Martin brings his own lifetime of interest in, and a wealth of person knowledge of, art to this novel set the in and around the New York gallery scene of the 1990s. The writing is not comic, but wry (Martin likens art collectors' emotions running from covetousness to buyer's remorse like “the extremes of nervousness associated with first dates and executions.”). Through Lacey, we tour actual museums and art spots in around the world, complete with running commentary.  Real artists and critics mix with the imaginary. The characters discuss Picasso and Andy Warhol, and we live the kaleidoscope of those heady New York days when you might see an installation at a gallery comprised of a fake art show complete with its own fake gallery-goers. more... x

Articles
Show, Don't Tell: Real Examples, Real Books, Real Good Stuff
by Erin Brown

Show, Don't Tell! This maxim makes writers want to tear their hair out more than any other (well, other than, "Our agency isn't interested, but best of luck"). I've touched upon this topic a few times in the past, but inevitably, almost every first-time author I work with must overcome the tendency to "tell" instead of "show."

Many writers become frustrated thinking that the essential writing advice of "Show versus tell" means that every plot point must be shown (Egads, does that mean that I need to include everyone's point of view???? What about when my character goes to the bathroom—do I have to show that?). This is not what show versus tell means.

Often authors simply tell the reader about a character's personality ("He was a mean man") instead of showing it through dialogue or inventive narrative ("After that no good varmint kicked all my puppies and salted my fields, he shot a squirrel on Main Street for no damn reason and rode outta town on a broken old mule"). more...

 

 

Bookmark and Share

Home |Interviews | Reviews | Articles | Bookstore | Editor's Blog | Archives | Links | About Us | Subscribe to Author RSS Feed
Copyright 2010 Pacific Northwest Writers Association. All Rights Reserved